You can check our facts yourself.

In these days of fake news, propaganda and lies, you have every right to be sceptical.

Here is every single statement from our website, and the source we got it from.

Hard Brexit

Brexit to cost £2,000 million per week

This is from a Government analysis, leaked to to the press. BuzzFeed's Alberto Nardelli, who has read the report, describes its content:

Under a comprehensive free trade agreement with the EU, UK growth would be 5% lower over the next 15 years compared to current forecasts, according to the analysis.

5% of GDP equates to £2,000 million (2 billion) per week. (The report also states that 'no deal' Brexit, that some Conservative and UKIP politicians support, would cost even more: 8% of GDP.)

The North East of England would be worst affected, with an 11% shortfall in growth; the North West, Northern Ireland and the West Midlands would also be badly affected. Regional numbers under this scenario are in the middle 'free trade' column; the disastrous 'no deal' Brexit is reflected in the rightmost column:

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Costs and benefits of different trade rules are included in the Government numbers.

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£40,000 million exit fee

Theresa May has already agreed to pay a £40,000 million (£40 billion) exit fee.

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Less tax revenue to pay for the NHS

If the economy is 5% smaller, the Government receives about 5% less in tax, and so government will have less money to spend than it would otherwise have done - or it will have to raise taxes to make up the difference. In the Government's 2017 spring budget, just over 18% of tax revenue was spent on the NHS.

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Difficult to recruit European NHS staff

If tough restrictions are put in place on recruiting EU workers, equivalent to those currently in place for non-EU citizens, doctors and nurses wanting to move to the UK to work in the NHS will find it harder. For instance they will have to meet a family income threshold.

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Already, applications from EU nurses to work in the UK have fallen sharply, from 1,304 per month down in July 2016 to just 46 in April 2017.

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British people lose right to work, study and retire in Europe unless we offer the same

The Government concedes on its website that there are no guarantees beyond 2 years after Brexit for UK citizens who live in the EU, or want to move there.

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Travel arrangements (for visiting, for instance on holiday or for work) have not yet been finalised in the Brexit negotiations, but several newspapers have reported, as recently as January 2018, that UK citizens might need a visa or electronic travel authorisation (similar to the $14 ESTA that UK travellers need to apply for before travelling to the USA) even for short trips.

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Control over immigration

If we leave the EU and the single market, we are no longer obliged to allow EU citizens to move to the UK. This is because we would no longer be signed up to the EU's Free Movement of Persons policy. However if we want British citizens to keep rights in the EU, we may have to offer similar rights to EU citizens here.

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Regulatory freedom

Outside the EU single market, we would no longer be bound by EU regulations. However we will still be a member of the WTO, and many free trade agreements include an obligation to align regulations.

For instance, the Trans Pacific Partnership, a proposed trade deal between the US and 11 other countries which Donald Trump has withdrawn support from, forces countries to align their regulations.

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Soft Brexit

This is a compromise recommended by businesses and trade unions

The Trades Union Congress (TUC), which represents almost all UK trade unions, says "joining the EEA is obviously best". (The EEA is the arrangement that Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein have with the EU, under which they are part of the single market.)

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Major business organisations including the Confederation of British Industry and the British Chamber of Commerce have also endorsed staying in the single market, at least as a temporary measure.

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The CBI has also said we should stay in the customs union (a related EU initiative that eases trade between countries) for the long term.

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£800 million a week cost to the economy

This is in the Government's own report.

BuzzFeed's Alberto Nardelli, who has seen the leaked figures, reports:

The softest Brexit option of continued single-market access through membership of the European Economic Area would, in the longer term, still lower growth by 2%.

This equates to around £800m per week in 15 years time.

Costs and benefits of different trade rules are included in the Government numbers.

The negative effect on the economy would vary from region to region, with the North East worst affected. Effects on different regions are in the 'single market' column of the table below.

table

 

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£150-170 million a week contribution to the EU budget

Countries in the single market, but which are not EU members, have to contribute to the EU budget at a slightly lower rate than EU members.

Norway is the closest example to a possible UK soft Brexit.

Based on Norway's relationship, the House of Commons has estimated a 25% reduction in UK contributions to the EU, and independent think tank Open Europe has estimated a 12% drop.

This would bring the current membership fee of around £200m down to between £150m and £170m.

The saving in the membership fee would therefore be smaller than the cost to the economy of leaving the EU.

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Less tax revenue to pay for the NHS

If the economy is 2% smaller, the Government receives about 2% less in tax, and so government will have less money to spend than it would otherwise have done - or it will have to raise taxes to make up the difference. In the Government's 2017 spring budget, just over 18% of tax revenue was spent on the NHS.

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We would be subject to EU rules but would have no say over them

Our relationship with the EU would be similar to Norway's, via the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement. Norway is a member of the single market and has to accept its rules, but it has no MEPs or European Commissioners fighting their corner.

Norway's prime minister Erna Solberg says:

We have no formal political representation in Brussels or Strasbourg, and no voting rights on the legislation that eventually will become national laws. We are not at the negotiating table when the EU is assembled and we’re lucky if we’ve made it into the hallways of Brussels.

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Guaranteed right to visa-free travel, and to live, work and study in Europe

Citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA) have freedom of movement in each other's countries. The EEA Agreement is a treaty between the EU and EFTA (representing Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein; Switzerland has a similar but slightly different deal). This means that UK citizens would be able to continue to travel and settle visa-free in the EU - but the UK would have to offer the same to EU citizens.

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No mobile phone roaming charges

The EU's abolition of mobile phone roaming charges applies to both EU and EEA countries.

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Keep EU employment protections

EU employment protections apply to EEA countries.

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We stay in the EU

£200 million a week contribution to the EU budget

Depending on how you calculate the UK's membership fee, once our rebate (discount) on membership is applied, the UK pays between £161m and £271m per week on EU membership. (We pay about £271m but get about £100m back in EU grants and contracts).

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We get to influence EU rules and decisions

If we stay in, the UK gets to keep its 73 democratically elected MEPs - the third largest delegation in the European Parliament. All the UK's main parties are represented.

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The UK keeps its European Commissioner, chosen by the Prime Minister. Currently the UK Commissioner is responsible for security - leading the fight against terrorism and organised crime across Europe.

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More and more people want a final say once the facts are known

Opinion pollsters have regularly polled on whether there should be a referendum on the final deal. The most recent showed a 16% lead in favour of doing so.

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